Friday Part 1

And we’re off! pre-show act The Antipoet kick us off with their patented Glastonbury track We Are The Warm-Up to a surprisingly crowded tent for this time of the morning on the first day. People are already signing up for the slam and the open mic. The set collapses and they shrug. They bounce, gyrate, and greet the audience with words and gestures, beckoning grins and nods and cheers drom the assembly. Topics covered include: politics, proper tea, festivals (and their alternatives), an elegy for a friend, and hipster grammar. The tent feels properly warmed now!

Compere Rosy Carrick takes to the stage like a glamorous poetry beacon in shades of flames to introduce the next section, inducing the audience to cheer like they’re watching Bowie in 2000, making a Mexican Wave of sound.

Scott Tyrrell has set up his easel, supported by son Toby, here for the first time. He’ll be live-illustrating proceedings, fighting the high winds that are keeping us all cool in the tent and the stage set unfortunately so mobile!

Courtney Conrad takes to the stage after a rousing introduction, letting us know that she kicked off her poetry writing after a break-up. Her set covers the intersections of gender, sexuality, race, religion, migration, and always being Other. We’re plunged immediately into the intimacy of family and clothes-fitting. I’m sure people have rhapsodised ad nauseam about the liquid, hypnotic mellowness of her voice, but it’s hard not to when it manages to support the intense combination of gentle yet frustrated, determined, emotional, yet almost academic words with its constant ripple, an incredibly articulate storyteller in English and Jamaican dialect. She chooses to redo early piece One Love with a better rendition (and breaks my heart with smiles and sadness combined), and honestly I wish more poets had that confidence and commitment to quality. Call me a fan!

Rosy and Vanessa Kisuule exchange happy banter about matching shorts (“I hate to objectify, but mate, you look banging!”) Rosy manages to squeeze in a poem from her latest collection about trainspotting (Ferroequinology). It is a species of frankly uncomfortably erotic, difficult and unusual and textured with the kind of words that trigger my synaesthesia.

Toby Campion takes to the stage in fantastic dungarees to a rock ’n’ roll track and kicks off with what he describes as a poem written the last time he was here, after seeing Adele, describing it as his own Adele Moment. He captures the audience immediately, then exchanges Midlands banter with an enthusiastic section of the crowd before going on to read from his book about his childhood, dropping us into the middle of a series of intimate word portraits of growing up queer in Leicester. His skill has only grown in the time I’ve known him – both words and stagecraft, and the audience are enraptured as the sequence of sketches slots into place. After this more family intimacy, grief, and humour. It takes and keeps everyone who listens. After the poem about his father’s terminal illness, he gives the audience a moment to take them through some studied breaths. If more artists took the time to practise radical care of their audiences, thw world would be a better place. And then his drunken, unedited poem, breaking the fourth wall with wrist-bitingly hysterical images. Clever, heartfelt poetry competing with a brass band and some ground-vibrating bass beats? He wins.

Rosy borrows my £5 flannel shirt against the chill of the wind. I don’t blame her – it’s an excellent shirt.

Desree takes to the stage like an explosion, with a series of pugilistic poems about #MeToo, gentrification, relationships, gender, toxic/ fragile masculinity, body image, race, privilege, abuse of power (and complicity), and all the important things to get angry about. Anyone who can make a list poem (an overused and all-too-often rubbish form) sing and dance, with quick feet and lightning punches deserves as much love and admiration as we can give them! Her poetry manages rapid-fire rage, clever allusion, and a glorious use of language and compassion and observation. She also uses trigger warnings to bring us into her piece about R. Kelly – well-needed and reminds me why I’ve bought into TW and CW – it gives people the option to leave or stay (literally or metaphorically), and allows us to protect our bruises.

Rosy gives us an ode to Arnold Schwarzenegger, letting us know that she’s hoping to build her body in a similar fashion… More double-entendre and angry eroticism, this time combined with the frustration of PhD writing.

Demi Anter takes to the stage in a teeshirt made by her father of her at the age of two. She warns the audience that they may hear things that upset them, but that the teeshirt will hopefully make them happy. She has a very specific stage presence I associate with American spoken word poets – crafted and confessional, borrowing from theatre and standup – but without that staleness and fake intimacy that I also preemptively associate with it (like a massive snob? probably), if that makes sense. She tackles love (self- and others), mental health, eating disorders, confidence, art-making, and family, and has longer intros than any of the other poets so far. The explicitness of the language sneaks up on you, broadsides of orgasms and trebuchets of sweary rage among the gentle intimacy. Her final piece lampoons Californian artist culture and DIY culture and Valley Girl speech, while at the same time being deeply personal and factual like a terrifying dating profile.

Liv Torc takes to the stage and we’re straight into family intimacy, and immediately afterwards the graphic, terrifying realities of childbirth, name-checking fictional, kick-arse heroines and bombarding us with visceral imagery and glorious wordplay, followed up by the lubricous romance of the damp patch. The ugly-beautiful realities of family life continue with a Kennings-laden piece about sharing a family bed that you can frankly smell! Family is the theme overall – connection and love and the physical texture of it. (She further wins my heart with a piece about hair and hands and genetic and cultural heritage, even though, for me, I’m the end of that particular line of curl and strength and stubbornness.) She ends, of course, with That Poem – the one about three generations and the legacy of a cluttered Earth – which still has the power to bring tears to the eye and throat (including her own). The arrival at the far entrance of people who are litter-picking is one of those Festival Magic moment.

Scott is still battling the wind, sketching Demi while Liv performs.

Somehow, despite this being a) a Festival, b) a stage of poets, we’re running under time. So Rosy yanks Luke Wright up to the stage. This is the most dressed-down I’ve ever seen the dandy wordsmith, but he grabs the opportunity to strut out an excessively impressive univocalism about North-South cultural differences.

Ana Paz takes to the stage with an abundance of energy, plunging into the intimacy of the audience with mic in hand, demanding that we exchange passion with a refrain of “I continue to fight”. After Luke and The Antipoet, she’s the most physically dynamic of the performers so far, combining lyricism and wild, wide, high imagery with the pace and punchiness of hip-hop. The performance is like dance – and, unlike many poets, especially those who use fast-paced urban rhythms, she lets the flow breathe. She isn’t afraid of pauses, floating silences louder than the (utterly unremitting) clamour outside the tent. She repeatedly thanks the audience for their energy and attention. It’s the quietest part of the day so far for the stage – an unfortunate period for someone who’s so very dynamic. But she switches pace down to one about grief and despair, the kind of helplessness that can lead to an end. She tells us that performance (and all art?) is about finding a mirror in each other. I’m totally stealing that phrase. Random people hug each other to her words, overwhelmed as she finishes talking about why she writes (and much of that appears to be to fill the gaps and inequities in our current cultural models of “truth”). Fabulous stuff, and I’m hoping she has a larger audience (and at least as equally enthused!) for her next performance with us.

Thunderclap Murphy takes to the stage, bringing looping equipment with a maze of cables, instruments, and buttons. I take the opportunity (while Rosy conducts a quiz and Liv covers my gear – thanks, Liv!) to grab a quick dash to the toilet and my packed lunch and return exactly in time to see him start his loop of musical layers to underlay a farewell poem by war poet Alun Lewis (Goodbye, published in 1944) – guitar, flute, song, handclaps and vocal percussion. He decides to go with a hip-hop, drum ’n’ bass vibe for the next one (after teaching us a beatboxing shortcut – “born to be clever, too clever to be too clever”, if you’re interested), Match of the Day, the persistent ice cream van theme in Dublin. The guitar is dark and the flute sounds like that place where Middle-Eastern/ Spanish music meet in liquid ripples and curves. He ends with an a cappella blessing, having us all chorus Sláinte!

Spoke-n-Word Day 1 (Thursday)

Winston Plowes is already out and about, summoning up poetry from unsuspecting members of the public. Transcript of the poem at the end of the post.

Transcript:

The Spoke-n-Word

Poem 1 – Thu

Mr Greedy meets Mr Skinny
At the market
a big man in a tie_dye
meets red feathers
and a neon pink turtle neck

In this hot summer
cool and colourful
warm with laughter
where cider drinkers
don’t need tickets
to make music stylish

Whether you’re fine
wavy and brown
buttoned and bright
may your friends
always be helpful X

By… The Mears Family / Chris B / Ben / Meg / Tori / Sophie / Rusty / Sara / Rhiannon, Hugo & Adam

Magical, Musical Poetry Preview

We were invited to join Tongue Fu at The Ancient Futures stage in the Tipi Field tonight. Fronted and formed into gloriously chaotic improvisational poetry goodness by Chris Redmond, a band makes magic out of already magnificent poetry. It’s never sounded like this, and it will never be the same again.First up of our poets: Paula Varjack, with typically cabaret-vibe élan, two pieces about the dangers of dating artists, and the perilous duality of bisexual, femme identity.Next up: our illustrator Scott Tyrrell with a cautionary tale about intimacy in the context of family life (the piece that, incidentally, got him into the final round of the BBC EdFringe Slam final (which he the won, obviously). Brace yourselves.Then, after an anecdote-song by the host about cannibalistic children (don’t ask), I got up to do my bilingual poem Stroke, but I have no evidence, so you’ll have to take my word for it.Next up the pugilistic compassion of our Poet-in-Residence Vanessa Kisuule, giving us her Malleable Manifesto – a way to live, or not, recognising your own divinity.The band expands, shimmying from Vanessa’s instruction to emulate James Brown looking out of the window into an extended riff as as a trumpet joins the line-up, beckoning our current slam champion Jackie Juno to the stage with a poem about how the universe birthed the world with a word – fitting the particular décor of the yurt and elevating it into magic.Chris then summons long-time co-creative-conspirator Liv Torc to deliver that extraordinary piece about three generations and the impact of truth and hope (as if accompanied by the band on the Titanic).Chris exhorts the crowd to our feet so we can join in the chorus to his song about us all rowing the same boat, along a similar theme of environmental responsibility, dedicated to Liv, then keeping us there for one more song, decrying the spying capabilities of social media (we all chant “Who’s telling me what?!”). A banging evening, a chance to get to know – and watch live finally – some of the other poets, and a great warm-up for the rest of the weekend!

Interview with Tony Walsh

We sent interview forms out to our artists, and we’ll be sharing their stories here on the blog. Next up:

Tony Walsh by Scott Tyrrell

Tony Walsh by Scott Tyrrell

Your Name

Tony Walsh

Website

http://www.longfella.co.uk/

Twitter handle

@LongfellaPoet

Instagram handle

@TonyWalshPoet

Video

Audio

https://soundcloud.com/tony-walsh

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=longfella%3A%20poet%20tony%20walsh&epa=SEARCH_BOX

How did you get into poetry/ spoken word?

I’ve written poetry since the age of 6 and still have my poems from primary school. I wrote until my mid teens and nothing then for many years until I was in my late 30s with two small children. I read my first poem in public at the age of 39 (2004) and made it to my first Glastonbury Festival within a year.

Who are your influences/ idols?

Idols is the wrong word but big respect and thanks to all the pioneers of spoken word, too many to list, and to everyone who first inspired me and welcomed me onto the Manchester then national scenes. I list a couple of hundred poets for people to checkout in the back of my first book, SEX & LOVE & ROCK&ROLL (Burning Eye 2013)

What’s the one thing you’d like people to know about your work?

I write for adults and children on a wide range of subjects and in lots of different styles/forms. It can be frustrating when people think that the one or two poems they may have heard is all that you’re about.

What advice would you give to someone starting out in spoken word/ performance poetry?

Read lots, get to as many events as you can, writeoutloud.net has a great gig guide, watch everything that you can on YouTube. I offer my own story and my thoughts on the seen in the Manifesto from the front of my book, a link to which I’ve included above.

Who are you looking forward to seeing/ what are you looking forward to doing at the Festival?

Showing my wife around for her first ever Glaso and sharing the whole crazy experience with her. Seeing and hearing poetry friends old and new. I try not to march around with a timetable but I’d be chuffed if I could catch a few from a list including: Janelle Monae, Lizzo, Fontaines DC, Chemical Brothers, Mavis Staples, Sheryl Crow, Johnny Marr, Slaves, Queen Zee, Pip Blom, Michael Kiwanuka, Neneh Cherry, Sharon Von Etten, She Drew The Gun, Kurt Vile, Dream Wife… blimey, getting excited now!

Have you been to Glastonbury Festival before?

Yes

What’s your stand-out memory of the Festival?

Being the official website Poet in Residence for the 2011 festival was pretty special. Thank you P&W!

What’s the one thing you simply must bring with you to the Festival?

An open mind.

What advice would you give someone visiting the Festival for the first time?

Try and see all of the site at least once (day and night) but accept that it won’t all be to your taste. Find the “festivals within the festival” that work best for you. There are quieter places to be found if it all gets a bit overwhelming. Pace yourself, it’s a marathon, not a sprint. Don’t try and see everything, the best things might well be a random happening on the way to the loo at 3am.

Have you performed at Glastonbury Poetry&Words before?

Yes, several times since 2005. I was Poet in Residence in 2011, hosted the slam one year and helped crew the stage for a few years too.

What’s your standout memory of performing at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage?

The naked man, covered in mud and apparently on acid, who slithered in with a film crew as I performed in 2005.

What advice would you give someone performing here for the first time?

The stage is very well run but, hey, it’s a festival and all sorts of random stuff could happen during your set. Be prepared, have a Plan B and go with the flow. Enjoy it and be sure to spend a lot of time in the poetry tent and backstage. How often can you meet/see so many other people who really get this cool, niche thing that we do? Help out if you can, help bark up a crowd etc.

What words would you use to describe your work/ your act?

poetry

What do you like best about doing whatever you call whatever it is that you do on stages?

It’s all about connection, innit. To move a space full of people, to make them laugh, cry, cheer, dance, think join in etc, is a privilege as well as being a real buzz that can sustain you over the many other hurdles of choosing the poet’s path in life.

Anything else you’d like to tell us?

Lots of exciting news to come soon across a range of genres and platforms – new book, tv work, music collaborations, opera, tour of UK and Ireland, kids stuff. Watch this space! Tx


You can see Tony Walsh at 17:35-18:05 Friday at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage. Read our previous article about him here.

Interview with Rosy Carrick

We sent interview forms out to our artists, and we’ll be sharing their stories here on the blog. Next up:

Rosy Carrick by Scott Tyrrell

Rosy Carrick by Scott Tyrrell

Your Name

Rosy Carrick

Website

http://www.rosycarrick.com

Twitter handle

@rosycarrick

Instagram handle

@rosycarrick

How did you get into poetry/ spoken word?

I started writing poetry when I was six years old and loved the feeling of having power over language!

Who are your influences/ idols?

Right now I can’t stop listening to Scatman John, though I dunno if I’d call him either an influence or an idol!

What’s the one thing you’d like people to know about your work?

It’s grotty n cool

What advice would you give to someone starting out in spoken word/ performance poetry?

In an ideal world, “Performance poetry” is just “Poetry”, performed well.

Who are you looking forward to seeing/ what are you looking forward to doing at the Festival?

Bananarama, Janelle Monae, Kylie, Lauryn Hill and the Wu – although I will inevitably end up just walking from one stage to another just in time to realise I’ve missed whoever I meant to see like usual…

Have you been to Glastonbury Festival before?

Yes

What’s your stand-out memory of the Festival?

David Bowie in 2000 was life-changingly awesome (not least cos it caused me to fall asleep in my English A level the following afternoon, fail it, get rejected from my University of choice, go through clearing instead and almost immediately get pregnant.) My daughter Olive, who is the inadvertent result of this adventure, will this year be joining me for her first ever Glatonbury – here’s hoping it doesn’t get her pregnant too!

What’s the one thing you simply must bring with you to the Festival?

WET WIPES!

What advice would you give someone visiting the Festival for the first time?

Aim to see no more than 2 bands a day and don’t buy drugs from strangers!

Have you performed at Glastonbury Poetry&Words before?

Yes

What’s your standout memory of performing at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage?

Well the first thing that comes to mind is banging ******* ***** backstage, but perhaps that would be a tad uncouth, so instead let’s go for this: the very first time I performed on the stage in 2003 there were torrential storms and poor Nathan Filer was first onstage – performing barefoot, calf-deep in water, inaudible over the sound of thunder, with all electricity and mics having been cut off. He did a sterling job!

What advice would you give someone performing here for the first time?

Sometimes there’s a big audience, sometimes there’s a small audience. Either way, have fun and everyone in there will have fun too!

What words would you use to describe your work/ your act?

poetry, live literature, compering

What do you like best about doing whatever you call whatever it is that you do on stages?

It’s different every time

Anything else you’d like to tell us?

I’ve just started wall-climbing and am well on my way to becoming the Cliffhanger of Hove!


You can see Rosy Carrick at 11:50-15:30 Friday; 15:30-19:00 Saturday; 11:50-14:30 Sunday at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage. Read our previous article about her here.

Interview with Fay Roberts

We sent interview forms out to our artists, and we’ll be sharing their stories here on the blog. Next up, well I thought I should probably do this as well:

Fay Roberts by Scott Tyrrell

Fay Roberts by Scott Tyrrell

Your Name

Fay Roberts

Website

http://www.fayroberts.co.uk

Twitter handle

@fayroberts

Instagram handle

@fayrobertsuk

Video

Audio


http://bit.ly/speakingstrings

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/FayRobertsPoet

How did you get into poetry/ spoken word?

Poetry was always something that other people wrote (and that I performed at school) for many years until I started dating a poet. Finally, in 2006, I entered the inaugural slam for a magazine run by a mate in order to support them. I was terrified, but that terror fed an adrenaline rush like nothing else I’d experienced in decades of performing music. It all kind of cascaded from there.

Who are your influences/ idols?

Zena Edwards, Rosie Garland, Mark Gwynne Jones, Jo Bell, Rachel Amey, Tina Sederholm… in fact, pretty much the whole cast of Other Voices over the years… way too many people to list. Let’s leave it there for now.

What’s the one thing you’d like people to know about your work?

It’s really hard to encapsulate in a short space of time.

What advice would you give to someone starting out in spoken word/ performance poetry?

Go to as many events as you can. Listen as well as perform. Be bold and apply for things you think you might never get. Do favours for people, but learn when and how to start setting boundaries around time, travel, cost, etc. Turn up on time, be pleasant to work with, treat it as a proper job, and yes – you can improve on your work; never stop working on your craft.

Who are you looking forward to seeing/ what are you looking forward to doing at the Festival?

Apart from all the performers at P&W (I’m wildly excited to see both those I know and those new to me; you may have picked that up from the blog), I really want to see Ms. Lauren Hill, Janelle Monae (even though I’m seeing her in London a couple of days later!), and KT Tunstall. I’m also looking forward to wandering around the site when I can (mostly on Thursday!) and taking in the atmosphere, plus catching up with a few old friends (and probably bouncing in a dance tent somewhere if I can persuade anyone to join me – and possibly just doing it anyway).

Have you been to Glastonbury Festival before?

Yes

What’s your stand-out memory of the Festival?

It’s a toss-up between the handfasting we helped witness in the Brigid garden, after watching the sun come up over the stone circle; the people duelling with rather large, muddied dildos in the middle of the night; and standing in a field that had turned into mudflats minus the salt, watching Faithless chant the sun out from behind the clouds. Mind you, not completely convinced that last one was Glasto…

What’s the one thing you simply must bring with you to the Festival?

A set of clean, dry clothes (or even just underwear) you’ve kept separate from everything else to travel home in.

What advice would you give someone visiting the Festival for the first time?

You cannot experience everything. Don’t timetable yourself too rigorously – leave aside some time to just wander and take it all in. Enjoy your Glastonbury, and enjoy other people’s anecdotes of their Glastonbury – don’t let FOMO screw you, and make sure you Maslow yourself (water, food, sleep)!

Have you performed at Glastonbury Poetry&Words before?

No

What words would you use to describe your work/ your act?

poetry, performance poetry, spoken word, theatre, music

What do you like best about doing whatever you call whatever it is that you do on stages?

That bit afterwards where people enthusiastically talk about the journey they went on listening to your work – it may be something completely different from what you intended, and that’s pretty magical!

Anything else you’d like to tell us?

I’m feeling an interesting combination of ferociously fortunate, giddily excited and mildly terrified. Can’t wait! ☺


You can see Fay Roberts at 12:05-12:30 Sunday at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage. Read our previous article about zir here.

Interview with Paula Varjack

We sent interview forms out to our artists, and we’ll be sharing their stories here on the blog. Next up:

Paula Varjack by Scott Tyrrell

Paula Varjack by Scott Tyrrell

Your Name

Paula Varjack

Website

http://www.paulavarjack.com/

Twitter handle

@paulavarjack

Instagram handle

@paulavarjack

Video

Audio

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/paulavarjackartist/

How did you get into poetry/ spoken word?

I was booked to do a cabaret gig on my 30th birthday, and decided to create a spoken word set for it

Who are your influences/ idols?

Yoko Ono, Maggie Estep, Sophie Calle, Laurie Anderson, Karen Finley, Dorothy Parker

What’s the one thing you’d like people to know about your work?

Prepare to be Varjacked…

What advice would you give to someone starting out in spoken word/ performance poetry?

Just dive in

Who are you looking forward to seeing/ what are you looking forward to doing at the Festival?

Wu-Tang Klan, Janet Jackson, Janelle Monae, Stormzy, Kylie, Tame Impala (but not necessarily in that order

Have you been to Glastonbury Festival before?

Yes

What’s your stand-out memory of the Festival?

There are too many! Most of my favourite ever live music performances: Beyonce, Kanye, Radiohead, James Blake, Hot Chip, but maybe one of my fave memories was walking into the sisterhood in shangri-la for the first time. An oasis of a woman only space.

What’s the one thing you simply must bring with you to the Festival?

Glitter, lots of unitards, rubber boots for the rain

What advice would you give someone visiting the Festival for the first time?

You will probably wish you packed something, and wonder why you packed something

Have you performed at Glastonbury Poetry&Words before?

Yes

What’s your standout memory of performing at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage?

I have no distinct performance memory really. Partly because I am lucky to have performed and hosted there 4 or 5 ? times and it’s all a bit of a beautiful blur!

What advice would you give someone performing here for the first time?

Go in open with no expectation, and just enjoy it.

What words would you use to describe your work/ your act?

spoken word, live literature, performance art, theatre, multidisciplinary entertainment, random words in a random order

What do you like best about doing whatever you call whatever it is that you do on stages?

the liveness of it

Anything else you’d like to tell us?

I can’t wait !


You can see Paula Varjack at 15:35-16:00 Friday at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage. Read our previous article about her here.

Interview with Courtney Conrad

We sent interview forms out to our artists, and we’ll be sharing their stories here on the blog. Next up:

Courtney Conrad by Scott Tyrrell

Courtney Conrad by Scott Tyrrell

Your Name

Courtney Conrad

Instagram handle

@ccpoetryyy

Video

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/ccpoetryyy/

How did you get into poetry/ spoken word?

I started in my undergrad year at the University of Birmingham when I joined Speak Out Society, this was in 2015

Who are your influences/ idols?

Andrea Gibson

What’s the one thing you’d like people to know about your work?

Listeners have an insight to unspoken words that have yet to be said to family, friends and lovers.

What advice would you give to someone starting out in spoken word/ performance poetry?

Never filter yourself on the basis of other’s perception of you

Who are you looking forward to seeing/ what are you looking forward to doing at the Festival?

I am looking forward to seeing Ms Lauryn Hill, Lizzo, Billie Eilish, Snow Patrol Hozier, and all the poets performing

Have you been to Glastonbury Festival before?

No

What words would you use to describe your work/ your act?

poetry, spoken word

What do you like best about doing whatever you call whatever it is that you do on stages?

That I get one step closer to finding the courage to free myself from societal expectations that holds the true me captive

Anything else you’d like to tell us?

My set will be an intricate construction of my lived experience, drawing on my hard-learned lessons with heritage, womanhood, family and the intersections of race, religion and sexuality.


You can see Courtney Conrad at 12:05-12:30 Friday; 13:45-15:10 Sunday at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage. Read our previous article about her here.

Interview with Paul Eccentric/ The Antipoet

We sent interview forms out to our artists, and we’ll be sharing their stories here on the blog. Next up:

The Antipoet by Scott Tyrrell

The Antipoet by Scott Tyrrell

Your Name

Paul Eccentric

Name of Act

The Antipoet

Website

https://www.theantipoet.co.uk/

Twitter handle

@theantipoet

Instagram handle

@onehalfoftheantipoet

Video

Audio

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/AntipoetThe/

How did you get into poetry/ spoken word?

In 1991 I supported John Hegley whilst singing with my band and decided that was what I wanted to do.

Who are your influences/ idols?

John Hegley and Ian Dury

What’s the one thing you’d like people to know about your work?

We play for food

What advice would you give to someone starting out in spoken word/ performance poetry?

Don’t give up your day job

Who are you looking forward to seeing/ what are you looking forward to doing at the Festival?

John Hegley and The Cure

Have you been to Glastonbury Festival before?

Yes

What’s your stand-out memory of the Festival?

Medical Tent 20 mins before being due on stage

What’s the one thing you simply must bring with you to the Festival?

Rum

What advice would you give someone visiting the Festival for the first time?

Bring loo paper

Have you performed at Glastonbury Poetry&Words before?

Yes

What’s your standout memory of performing at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage?

Holding the record for the highest number of entries in the accident book

What advice would you give someone performing here for the first time?

Play the cafes and the bars as well as the slots you’re paid for. Great way to sell books and they pay in food and rum!

What words would you use to describe your work/ your act?

random words in a random order

What do you like best about doing whatever you call whatever it is that you do on stages?

The horror on people’s faces

Anything else you’d like to tell us?

We’re Artists, we’re of a sensitive disposition


You can see Paul Eccentric/ The Antipoet at 11:30-12:00 every day at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage. Read our previous article about them here.

Interview with Vanessa Kisuule

We sent interview forms out to our artists, and we’ll be sharing their stories here on the blog. Next up:

Vanessa Kisuule by Scott Tyrrell

Vanessa Kisuule by Scott Tyrrell

Your Name

Vanessa Kisuule

Website

https://www.vanessakisuule.com/

Twitter handle

@Vanessa_Kisuule

Video

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/VanessaKisuule/

How did you get into poetry/ spoken word?

Through a YouTube hole.

Who are your influences/ idols?

Patricia Smith, Salena Godden, Joelle Taylor, Hollie Mcnish, Bohdan Piasecki, Rob Auton, Danez Smith, Caroline Bird, Raymond Antrobus….and on and on and on!

What’s the one thing you’d like people to know about your work?

Make of it what you will!

Who are you looking forward to seeing/ what are you looking forward to doing at the Festival?

Janet Jackson, Kylie, Janelle Monae, Stormzy, The Cure.

Have you been to Glastonbury Festival before?

Yes

What’s your stand-out memory of the Festival?

Naive, 18 year old me dancing in a cage at 3am with a masked man in PVC lederhosen.

Have you performed at Glastonbury Poetry&Words before?

Yes

What’s your standout memory of performing at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage?

My outfit. My lip stick was blue and I had customized shorts fringed with these stupidly long chains of safety pins. Serious safety hazard, in hindsight!

What words would you use to describe your work/ your act?

poetry, performance poetry, spoken word, live literature, random words in a random order

What do you like best about doing whatever you call whatever it is that you do on stages?

The motley crew of other poets I get to hang out with.


You can see Vanessa Kisuule at 16:05-16:30 Sunday at the Glastonbury Poetry&Words stage. Read our previous article about her here.